SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Journal: Nursing management (Harrow, London, England : 1994)

25

This month’s Nursing Management features a disturbing report into bullying at a leading London healthcare provider. An investigation by academics at Plymouth University reveals a frequency of bullying at Barts Health NHS Trust four times the national average and a prevailing culture of incivility and unpleasantness.

24

‘To find grace, watch a 16-year-old carer feed an 85-year-old woman with severe dementia, but pass by those in the office writing care plans’ ( Barritt 2005 ).

Concepts: Alzheimer's disease, Dementia, Canal+, NBC, Must See TV

24

Did you know that one sixth of smartphone owners check their mobile devices 50 times a day? If that sounds like something you do, try the Forest app.

Concepts: Personal digital assistant, Mobile device, Radio, Information appliances

5

The Antrim Area Hospital Early Warning Score (HEWS) is an innovative method of assessing the level of pressure on an acute hospital site. It combines eight indicators to produce a score from 0 to 49, which is mapped to an escalation category, ranging from low to extreme pressure. The top two categories, ‘severe’ and ‘extreme’, have a corresponding range of escalation actions across service areas. This article explains why the Antrim Area HEWS was developed and the issues it sought to address, including ‘escalation fatigue’ among staff because of the normalisation of high alert status. The article includes an analysis of Antrim Area HEWS data collected over one year. It discusses the benefits of the Antrim Area HEWS including: the provision of a simple, objective method for assessing site pressure; increased awareness of site pressure among various service areas; enhanced staff support and understanding of the need for effective escalation; and the development of a focused and meaningful approach that has overcome the escalation fatigue associated with previous escalation frameworks.

1

The transition from student to newly qualified nurse can be challenging. A period of preceptorship is recommended to support newly qualified nurses in their new work environment, and to give them time to adapt and gain confidence. Researchers have developed a toolkit based on previous research that contains several resources that nurse managers, teams and organisations can use to develop and improve preceptorship for newly qualified nurses. The toolkit includes an organisational support tool, a managerial support framework, a supernumerary time tool and a local culture of support tool. This article describes these resources and gives an example of how the toolkit can be adapted locally.

1

Young people volunteering on acute hospital wards can provide extra support to older patients, for example with eating and drinking, with mobilising and with therapeutic activities. This extra support can reduce nurses' workload while providing older people with opportunities to interact and engage. For the young people involved, volunteering can improve their skills and confidence, as well as providing opportunities for career development. Nurses are well-placed for developing and managing volunteer services due to their leadership, clinical skills and experience. This article describes a volunteer project where young people aged 16 years and above support older people on acute hospital wards in an NHS trust in England. The project was designed and managed by a nurse using the NURTURe model, a framework for planning, developing and organising volunteer services to support older patients on acute hospital wards.

1

The emergence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has meant that nurse leaders need to respond rapidly and decisively to the demands and challenges of a pandemic in a context of increased staff shortages and limited resources. This article suggests essential leadership skills and characteristics that nurses can use to underpin effective leadership in a crisis, emphasising the importance of decision-making and emotional intelligence. It also addresses two important questions: ‘what do leaders in a crisis need to do that differs from any other time?’ and ‘what does effective leadership look like in a crisis?’

1

Most research on resilience in healthcare systems such as the NHS is based on organisational crises, such as nurse shortages, an ageing workforce and financial restrictions. However, nursing can learn lessons from the past to consider how to become more resilient, particularly considering the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic. This article briefly looks at previous pandemics and disasters that have affected healthcare systems, as well as the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, and considers how nurse leaders can support staff and show organisational resilience during such emergencies. The article also discusses how nurse leaders can develop their own resilience.

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Predicting nurse turnover is important to prevent expensive and avoidable staff loss. One factor that may influence nurse turnover is nurse managers' leadership styles. Three main leadership styles have been identified: transactional, in which leaders give contingent rewards; transformational, in which leaders inspire and motivate; and passive-avoidant, in which leaders are absent.

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Several high-profile inquiries and reports, including the Report of the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry, by Sir Robert Francis QC, have identified that nurse staffing is an essential factor in patient safety and patient mortality rates. Since the Francis report, several policies and initiatives aimed at ensuring safe staffing in the NHS have been developed alongside guidance and evidence-based safe staffing tools, while the Care Quality Commission has been tasked with ensuring compliance with these policies. In 2015, the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Policy Research Programme commissioned research to examine the extent to which safe staffing policies have translated into practice locally in the NHS. This article summarises and examines the main findings of this research and suggests that, although policies have raised the profile of nurse staffing, nursing shortages have impeded their implementation.