SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Journal: Journal of virology

42

Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of viral entry has been a major concern for epidemiology, vaccine development and antibody-based drug therapy. However, the molecular mechanism behind ADE is still elusive. Coronavirus spike protein mediates viral entry into cells by first binding to a receptor on host cell surface and then fusing viral and host membranes. Here we investigated how a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb), which targets the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of MERS coronavirus spike, mediates viral entry using pseudovirus entry and biochemical assays. Our results showed that mAb binds to the virus-surface spike, allowing it to undergo conformational changes and become prone to proteolytic activation. Meanwhile, mAb binds to cell-surface IgG Fc receptor, guiding viral entry through canonical viral-receptor-dependent pathways. Our data suggest that the antibody/Fc-receptor complex functionally mimics viral receptor in mediating viral entry. Moreover, we characterized mAb dosages in viral-receptor-dependent, antibody-dependent, and both-receptors-dependent entry pathways, delineating guidelines on mAb usages in treating viral infections. Our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism for antibody-enhanced viral entry and can guide future vaccination and antiviral strategies.Significance Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of viral entry has been observed for many viruses. It was shown that antibodies target one serotype of viruses but only sub-neutralize another, leading to ADE of the latter viruses. Here we identify a novel mechanism for ADE: a neutralizing antibody binds to the virus-surface spike protein of coronaviruses like a viral receptor, triggers a conformational change of the spike, and mediates viral entry into IgG-Fc-receptor-expressing cells through canonical viral-receptor-dependent pathways. We further evaluated how antibody dosages impacted viral entry into cells expressing viral receptor, Fc receptor, or both receptors. This study reveals complex roles of antibodies in viral entry and can guide future vaccine design and antibody-based drug therapy.

40

During the summer of 2012, in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia a hitherto unknown coronavirus was isolated from the sputum of a patient with acute pneumonia and renal failure (1, 2).…

Concepts: Saudi Arabia, Arabian Peninsula, Riyadh, United Arab Emirates, Middle East, Qatar, Jordan, Arabic language

38

Strategies are needed to improve the immunogenicity of HIV-1 envelope (Env) antigens for more long lived, efficacious HIV-1 vaccine induced B-cell responses. HIV-1 Env gp140 (native or un-cleaved molecules) or gp120 monomeric proteins elicit relatively poor B-cell responses which are short-lived. We hypothesized that Env engagement of the CD4 receptor on T-helper cells may result in anergic effects on T-cell recruitment and consequently a lack of strong robust and durable B-memory responses. To test this hypothesis we occluded the CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of gp140 by stable cross-linking with a 3kD CD4 miniprotein mimetic serving to block ligation of gp140 on CD4+T-cells while preserving CD4 inducible (CDi) neutralizing and epitopes targeted by antibody dependent cellular cytotoxic (ADCC) effector responses. Importantly immunization of rhesus macaques consistently gave superior B-cell (p<0.001) response kinetics and superior ADCC (p<0.014) in a group receiving the CD4bs-occluded vaccine compared to those animals immunized with gp140. Of the cytokines examined, Ag-specific IL-4 T-helper ELISpots in the CD4bs-occluded group increased earlier (p=0.025) during the inductive phase. Importantly CD4bs-occluded gp140 antigen not only induced superior B-cell and ADCC responses, the elevated B-cell responses proved to be remarkably durable lasting more than 60 weeks post-immunization.IMPORTANCE Attempts to develop HIV vaccines capable of inducing potent and durable B-cell responses have until now been unsuccessful. Antigen specific B-cell development and affinity maturation occurs in germinal centers in lymphoid follicles through a critical interaction between B-cells and T follicular helper cells. The HIV envelope binds the CD4 receptor on T-cells as soluble shed antigen or as antigen antibody complexes causing impairment in the activation of these specialized CD4 positive T-cells. We proposed that CD4-binding impairment may in part be responsible for the relatively poor B-cell responses to HIV envelope based vaccines. To test this hypothesis we blocked the CD4 binding site of the envelope antigen and compared it to currently used unblocked envelope protein. We found superior and durable B-cell responses in macaques vaccinated with an occluded CD4 binding site on the HIV envelope antigen, demonstrating a potentially important new direction in future design of new HIV vaccines.

Concepts: Immune system, Protein, Vaccination, B cell, T helper cell, Adaptive immune system, T cell, Major histocompatibility complex

37

Evaluation of the epitope specificities, location (systemic, mucosal) and effector function of antibodies elicited by novel HIV-1 immunogens engineered to improve exposure of specific epitopes is critical for HIV-1 vaccine development. Utilizing an array of humoral assays, we evaluated the magnitude, epitope specificity, avidity and function of systemic and mucosal immune responses elicited by a vaccine regimen containing Env cross-linked to a CD4 mimetic miniprotein (gp140-M64U1) in rhesus macaques. Crosslinking of gp140 Env with M64U1 resulted in an earlier increase in both the magnitude and avidity of the IgG binding response compared to Env protein alone. Notably, binding IgG responses at an early time point correlated with Antibody Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) function at the peak immunity time point, which was higher for the crosslinked Env group compared to the Env group alone. In addition, the crosslinked Env group developed higher IgG responses against a linear epitope in the C1 gp120 region of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein. These data demonstrate that structural modification of the HIV-1 envelope immunogen by crosslinking gp140 with the CD4 mimetic M64U1 elicited an earlier increase of binding antibody responses and altered the specificity of the IgG responses that correlated with the rise of subsequent antibody-mediated antiviral functions.IMPORTANCE The development of an efficacious HIV-1 vaccine remains a global priority to prevent new cases of HIV-1 infection. Of the six HIV-1 efficacy trials to date, only one has demonstrated partial efficacy, and the immune correlates analysis of this trial revealed a role for binding antibodies and antibody Fc mediated effector functions. New HIV-1 envelope immunogens are being engineered to selectively expose the most vulnerable and conserved sites on the HIV-1 envelope with the goal of eliciting antiviral antibodies. Evaluation of the humoral responses elicited by these novel immunogen designs in nonhuman primates is critical for understanding how to improve upon immunogen design to inform further testing in human clinical trials. Our results demonstrate that Env structural modifications that aim to mimic the CD4 bound conformation can result in earlier antibody elicitation, altered epitope specificity and increased antiviral function post immunization.

Concepts: Immune system, Antibody, Immunology, Humoral immunity, Immunity, Antigen, Primate, Epitope

33

Recently a novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) has emerged from Wuhan, China, causing symptoms in humans similar to those caused by SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Since SARS-CoV outbreak in 2002, extensive structural analyses have revealed key atomic-level interactions between SARS-CoV spike protein receptor-binding domain (RBD) and its host receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which regulate both the cross-species and human-to-human transmissions of SARS-CoV. Here we analyzed the potential receptor usage by 2019-nCoV, based on the rich knowledge about SARS-CoV and the newly released sequence of 2019-nCoV. First, the sequence of 2019-nCoV RBD, including its receptor-binding motif (RBM) that directly contacts ACE2, is similar to that of SARS-CoV, strongly suggesting that 2019-nCoV uses ACE2 as its receptor. Second, several critical residues in 2019-nCoV RBM (particularly Gln493) provide favorable interactions with human ACE2, consistent with 2019-nCoV’s capacity for human cell infection. Third, several other critical residues in 2019-nCoV RBM (particularly Asn501) are compatible with, but not ideal for, binding human ACE2, suggesting that 2019-nCoV has acquired some capacity for human-to-human transmission. Last, while phylogenetic analysis indicates a bat origin of 2019-nCoV, 2019-nCoV also potentially recognizes ACE2 from a diversity of animal species (except mice and rats), implicating these animal species as possible intermediate hosts or animal models for 2019-nCoV infections. These analyses provide insights into the receptor usage, cell entry, host cell infectivity and animal origin of 2019-nCoV, and may help epidemic surveillance and preventive measures against 2019-nCoV.SignificanceThe recent emergence of Wuhan coronavirus (2019-nCoV) puts the world on alert. 2019-nCoV is reminiscent of the SARS-CoV outbreak in 2002-2003. Our decade-long structural studies on the receptor recognition by SARS-CoV have identified key interactions between SARS-CoV spike protein and its host receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which regulate both the cross-species and human-to-human transmissions of SARS-CoV. One of the goals of SARS-CoV research was to build an atomic-level iterative framework of virus-receptor interactions to facilitate epidemic surveillance, predict species-specific receptor usage, and identify potential animal hosts and animal models of viruses. Based on the sequence of 2019-nCoV spike protein, we apply this predictive framework to provide novel insights into the receptor usage and likely host range of 2019-nCoV. This study provides a robust test of this reiterative framework, providing the basic, translational and public health research communities with predictive insights that may help study and battle this novel 2019-nCoV.

33

Next-generation sequencing was used for discovery and de novo assembly of a novel, highly divergent DNA virus at the interface between the Parvoviridae and Circoviridae. The virus, provisionally named “parvovirus-like” hybrid virus (PHV), is nearly identical by sequence to another DNA virus, NIH-CQV, previously reported in Chinese patients with seronegative (non-A-E) hepatitis. Although we initially detected PHV in a wide range of clinical samples, with all strains sharing ∼99% nucleotide and amino acid identity with each other and with NIH-CQV, the exact origin of the virus was eventually traced to contaminated silica-binding spin columns used for nucleic acid extraction. Definitive confirmation of the origin of PHV, and presumably NIH-CQV, was obtained by in-depth analyses of water eluted through contaminated spin columns. Analysis of environmental metagenome libraries detected PHV sequences in coastal marine waters of North America, suggesting that a potential association between PHV and diatoms (algae) that generate the silica matrix used in the spin columns may have resulted in inadvertent viral contamination during manufacture. The confirmation of PHV/NIH-CQV as laboratory reagent contaminants and not bona fide infectious agents of humans underscores the rigorous approach needed to establish the validity of new viral genomes discovered by next-generation sequencing.

Concepts: DNA, Gene, Bacteria, Metabolism, Virus, Genome, RNA, Nucleic acid

28

Avian influenza virus (AIV) surveillance in Antarctica during 2013 revealed the prevalence of evolutionarily distinct influenza viruses of H11N2 subtype in Adélie penguins. Here we present results from the continued surveillance of AIV on the Antarctic Peninsula during 2014 and 2015. In addition to the continued detection of H11 subtype viruses during 2014 in a snowy sheathbill, we isolated a novel H5N5 subtype virus during 2015 in a chinstrap penguin. Gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis revealed that the H11 virus detected in 2014 had a >99.1% nucleotide similarity to the H11N2 viruses isolated in 2013, suggesting continued prevalence of this virus over multiple years in Antarctica. However, phylogenetic analysis of the H5N5 virus showed that their genome segments were recently introduced into the continent, except for the NP gene that was similar to that in the endemic H11N2 viruses. Our analysis indicates geographically diverse origins for the H5N5 virus genes; with the majority of its genome segments derived from North American lineage viruses, but the neuraminidase gene derived from a Eurasian lineage virus. In summary, we show the persistence of AIV lineages over multiple years in Antarctica; recent introduction of gene segments from diverse regions; and reassortment between different AIV lineages in Antarctica, which together, significantly increases our understanding of AIV ecology in this fragile and pristine environment.

Concepts: DNA, Gene, Microbiology, Virus, Influenza, Avian influenza, Penguin, Antarctica

28

Influenza NS1 protein is the main viral protein counteracting host innate immune responses, allowing the virus to efficiently replicate in interferon (IFN)-competent systems. In this manuscript, we analyzed NS1 protein variability within influenza A (IAV) H3N2 viruses infecting humans during the 2012/2013 season. We also evaluated the impact of the mutations on the ability of NS1 proteins to inhibit the host innate immune responses and general gene expression. Surprisingly, a previously unidentified mutation in the double stranded (ds)RNA-binding domain (I64T) decreased NS1-mediated general inhibition of host protein synthesis, by decreasing its interaction with the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30), leading to increased innate immune responses after viral infection. Notably, a recombinant A/Puerto Rico/8/34 H1N1 virus encoding the H3N2 NS1-T64 protein was highly attenuated in mice, most likely because of its ability to induce higher antiviral IFN responses at early times after infection, and because this virus is highly sensitive to the IFN-induced antiviral state. Interestingly, using Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) collected at the acute visit (days 2-3 after infection), we show that the subject infected with the NS1-T64 attenuated virus has diminished responses to interferon and to interferon induction, suggesting why this subject could be infected with this highly IFN-sensitive virus. These data demonstrate the importance of influenza virus surveillance to identify new mutations in the NS1 protein affecting its ability to inhibit innate immune responses, and as a consequence, the pathogenicity of the virus.

Concepts: Immune system, DNA, Gene, Bacteria, Virus, Innate immune system, Infection, Influenza

28

Budding of filoviruses, arenaviruses, and rhabdoviruses is facilitated by subversion of host proteins, such as Nedd4 E3 ubiquitin ligase, by viral PPxY late (L) budding domains expressed within the matrix proteins of these RNA viruses. As L domains are important for budding and are highly conserved in a wide array of RNA viruses, they represent potential broad-spectrum targets for the development of antiviral drugs. To identify potential competitive blockers, we used the known Nedd4 WW-domain/PPxY interaction interface as the basis of an in silico screen. Using PPxY-dependent budding of Marburg (MARV) VP40 virus-like particles (VLPs) as our model system, we identified small molecule hit 1: that inhibited Nedd4-PPxY interaction and PPxY-dependent budding. This lead candidate was subsequently improved with additional structure-activity relationship (SAR) analog testing which enhanced anti-budding activity into the nanomolar range. Current leads 4: and 5: exhibit on-target effects by specifically blocking the MARV VP40 PPxY-host Nedd4 interaction and subsequent PPxY-dependent egress of MARV VP40 VLPs. In addition, leads 4: and 5: exhibited anti-budding activity against Ebola and Lassa fever VLPs, as well as vesicular stomatitis (VSV) and rabies (RABV) viruses. These data provide target validation and suggest that inhibition of the PPxY-Nedd4 interaction can serve as the basis for the development of a novel class of broad-spectrum, host-oriented antivirals targeting viruses that depend on a functional PPxY L domain for efficient egress.

Concepts: Protein, Microbiology, Virus, Genome, RNA, Antiviral drug, Influenza, Mononegavirales

28

The role of the tegument during the herpesvirus lytic cycle is still not clearly established, particularly at the late phase of infection, when the newly produced viral particles need to be fully assembled before being released from the infected cell. The Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) protein coded by ORF9 (ORF9p) is an essential tegument protein and, even though its mRNA is the most expressed during the productive infection, little is known about its functions. Using a GalK positive/negative selection technique, we modified a BAC containing the complete VZV genome creating viruses expressing mutant versions of ORF9p.We showed that ORF9p is hyper-phosphorylated during the infection, especially through its interaction with the viral Ser/Thr kinase ORF47p; we identified a consensus site within ORF9p recognized by ORF47p and demonstrated its importance for ORF9p phosphorylation. Strikingly, an ultra-structural analysis revealed that the mutation of this consensus site (Glutamate 85 to Arginine) strongly affects viral assembly and release, reproducing ORF47 kinase dead VZV phenotype. It also slightly diminishes the infectivity towards immature dendritic cells. Taken together, our results identify ORF9p as a new viral substrate of ORF47p and suggest a determinant role of this phosphorylation for viral infectivity, especially during the process of viral particle formation and egress.

Concepts: DNA, Gene, Virus, Herpesviridae, Virus latency, Chickenpox, Varicella zoster virus, Alphaherpesvirinae