SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Journal: Influenza and other respiratory viruses

219

In December 2019, transmission of the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) that causes coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) occurred in Wuhan, China1 .And later the virus began to be transmitted from person to person2 .Face masks are a type of personal protective equipment used to prevent the spread of respiratory infections,it may be effective at helping prevent transmission of respiratory viruses and bacteria3 .Here, we share a case of face masks are be used to prevent the transmission of COVID-19 infection.

169

Severe influenza infection represents a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality. Although influenza is primarily considered a viral infection that results in pathology limited to the respiratory system, clinical reports suggest that influenza infection is frequently associated with a number of clinical syndromes that involve organ systems outside the respiratory tract. A comprehensive Medline literature review of articles pertaining to extra-pulmonary complications of influenza infection, using organ-specific search terms, yielded 234 articles including case reports, epidemiologic investigations, and autopsy studies that were reviewed to determine the clinical involvement of other organs. The most frequently described clinical entities were viral myocarditis and viral encephalitis. Recognition of these extra-pulmonary complications is critical to determining the true burden of influenza infection and initiating organ-specific supportive care. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Concepts: Infectious disease, Pulmonology, Respiratory system, Larynx, Upper respiratory tract, Mucus, Copyright, Respiratory tract

152

Respiratory protective devices are critical in protecting against infection in health care workers at high risk of novel 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19); however, recommendations are conflicting and epidemiological data on their relative effectiveness against COVID-19 are limited.

140

Self-collection of nasal swabs could improve the timeliness of influenza virus detection in older adults.

Concepts: Virus, Influenza, Reassortment

136

The burden of influenza in Norway remains uncertain, and data on seasonal variations and differences by age groups are needed.

102

Whether morbidity from the 1918-19 influenza pandemic discriminated by socioeconomic status has remained a subject of debate for 100 years. In lack of data to study this issue recent literature have hypothesized that morbidity was “socially neutral”.

Concepts: Socioeconomic status, Sociology, Influenza, Avian influenza, Influenza pandemic, Pandemic, 1918 flu pandemic

69

The 1918 devastating influenza pandemic left a lasting impact on influenza experts and the public, and the importance of global influenza surveillance was soon recognized. The WHO Global Influenza Surveillance Network (GISN) was founded in 1952 and renamed to Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System in 2011 upon the adoption by the World Health Assembly, of the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework for the Sharing of Influenza Viruses and Access to Vaccines and Other Benefits (“PIP Framework”). The importance of influenza surveillance had been recognized and promoted by experts prior to the years leading up to the establishment of WHO. In the 65 years of its existence, the Network has grown to comprise 143 National Influenza Centers recognized by WHO, 6 WHO Collaborating Centers, 4 Essential Regulatory Laboratories, and 13 H5 Reference Laboratories. The Network has proven its excellence throughout these 65 years, providing detailed information on circulating seasonal influenza viruses, as well as immediate response to the influenza pandemics in 1957, 1968, and 2009, and to threats caused by animal influenza viruses and by zoonotic transmission of coronaviruses. For its central role in global public health, the Network has been highly recognized by its many partners and by international bodies. Several generations of world renown influenza scientists have brought the Network to where it is now and they will take it forward to the future, as influenza will remain a pre-eminent threat to humans and to animals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

62

We aim to examine the efficacy of medical masks and respirators in protecting against respiratory infections using pooled data from two homogenous randomised control clinical trials (RCTs).

Concepts: Health care, Medicine, Clinical trial, Infectious disease

46

Estimates of influenza disease burden are broadly useful for public health, helping national and local authorities monitor epidemiologic trends, plan and allocate resources, and promote influenza vaccination. Historically, estimates of the burden of seasonal influenza in the United States, focused mainly on influenza-related mortality and hospitalization, were generated every few years. Since the 2010-2011 influenza season, annual US influenza burden estimates have been generated and expanded to include estimates of influenza-related outpatient medical visits and symptomatic illness in the community.

Concepts: Health care, Public health, Health, Epidemiology, Infectious disease, Vaccine, Influenza, Seasons

43

The Meuse-Argonne offensive, a decisive battle during the First World War, is the largest frontline commitment in American military history involving 1·2 million U.S. troops. With over 26 000 deaths among American soldiers, the offensive is considered “America’s deadliest battle”. The Meuse-Argonne offensive coincided with the highly fatal second wave of the influenza pandemic in 1918. In Europe and in U.S. Army training camps, 1918 pandemic influenza killed around 45 000 American soldiers making it questionable which battle should be regarded “America’s deadliest”. The origin of the influenza pandemic has been inextricably linked with the men who occupied the military camps and trenches during the First World War. The disease had a profound impact, both for the military apparatus and for the individual soldier. It struck all the armies and might have claimed toward 100 000 fatalities among soldiers overall during the conflict while rendering millions ineffective. Yet, it remains unclear whether 1918 pandemic influenza had an impact on the course of the First World War. Still, even until this day, virological and bacteriological analysis of preserved archived remains of soldiers that succumbed to 1918 pandemic influenza has important implications for preparedness for future pandemics. These aspects are reviewed here in a context of citations, images, and documents illustrating the tragic events of 1918.

Concepts: Influenza, Influenza pandemic, Pandemic, United States Army, Military, Army, World War I, Soldier