SciCombinator

Discover the most talked about and latest scientific content & concepts.

Concept: Self-help

210

Access to Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for depression is limited. One solution is CBT self-help books. Trial Objectives: To assess the impact of a guided self-help CBT book (GSH-CBT) on mood, compared to treatment as usual (TAU). Hypotheses:GSH-CBT will have improved mood and knowledge of the causes and treatment of depression compared to the control receiving TAUGuided self-help will be acceptable to patients and staff.

Concepts: Psychology, Randomized controlled trial, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Major depressive disorder, Control, Book, Self-help, Books

0

Depression is an extremely common mental health disorder, with prevalence rates rising. Low-intensity interventions are frequently used to help meet the demand for treatment. Bibliotherapy, for example, is often prescribed via books on prescription schemes (for example ‘Reading Well’ in England) to those with mild to moderate symptomology. Bibliotherapy can effectively reduce symptoms of depression (Naylor et al., 2010). However, the majority of self-help books are based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), which may not be suitable for all patients. Research supports the use of positive psychology interventions for the reduction of depression symptoms (Bolier et al., 2013) and as such self-help books from this perspective should be empirically tested.

Concepts: Psychology, Mental disorder, Clinical psychology, Positive psychology, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Self-help, Self-help book, Self-help books

0

This self-help book written by cancer expert Patricia Peat and 37 contributors explores strategies that patients and their families can adopt to help regain control of their lives, such as diet, exercise and supportive therapies.

Concepts: Health care, Medicine, Oncology, Obesity, Future, Overweight, Weight loss, Self-help

0

Worldwide, the number of obese persons continues to grow. Online-mediated self-help groups represent an opportunity for obese persons to support each other. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether and how the use of and active participation in online self-help groups is associated with perceived informational and emotional support among obese adults.

Concepts: Obesity, Grammatical person, Self-help, Self-help groups for mental health

0

There is a significant gap in our knowledge regarding community-based self-help groups and their benefits for persons living with mental conditions and their family caregivers in low and middle income countries. This study describes a such a program in El Salvador and explores participants' perceptions of program effectiveness and benefits.

Concepts: Family, Psychology, Mental disorder, Income, Middle class, El Salvador, Self-help, Self-help groups for mental health

0

0

Introduction: Cancer patients generally have a great need for disease-related information. They prefer to be informed personally by the attending doctor. Yet, they also use other sources, mostly from medical laypersons or public media. The goal of our survey was to obtain insight into information patients get and their requirements regarding information. Methods and participants: Using a standardized questionnaire, we conducted a survey on 226 patients and 32 relatives, who attended meetings providing information for cancer patients. Results: Patients were generally content or highly content with the information they got. The direct consultation with the doctor is the most important source of information especially for older patients. Information by other patients and self-help groups rank second, followed by internet and online chats, which both are of minor importance for patients older than 60 years. From the patients' point of view, sources of information should be individualized and comprehensive, provided by experts and allowing for questions. Patients prefer one constant person for communication. Remarkably, empathic communication was not rated as important. Age and gender are not associated with these preferences for these characteristics of sources of information. Discussion: Patients' and relatives' desire for an individualized, comprehensive counseling with high expertise provided by one person points to the limits of resources of the health system. The importance of additional information material will rise accordingly. This material should be tailored to the needs of diverse patient groups.

Concepts: Patient, Physician, Communication, Expert, Preference, Need, Doctor, Self-help

0

0

Background/Aims: Twelve-step mutual self-help groups provide cost-effective support for recovery from substance misuse problems. Evidence suggests they are successful as an adjunct to formal treatment and that referral from clinicians is important in fostering engagement. Methods: This study surveyed substance misuse treatment professionals employed within two agencies in Birmingham (UK). Results: A total of 92 clinicians (79.3%) eligible to participate completed a questionnaire that explored their attitudes, knowledge and referral practices with regard to 12-step groups (TSGs). Most (74%) had a positive attitude, and almost 80% referred at least some of their clients to TSGs. However, 30% had not referred any clients in the past month, and multivariate analysis showed that referral was associated with greater objective knowledge about TSGs when other factors were controlled for. Conclusions: These results have implications for linking professional treatment to mutual self-help groups, and potential strategies to increase referral are discussed. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

Concepts: Multivariate statistics, Recovery model, REFER, Twelve-step program, Self-help, Self-help groups for mental health, Recovery International

0